Why the King James Bible Endures – NYTimes.com

Not everyone prefers a God who talks like a pal or a guidance counselor. Even some of us who are nonbelievers want a God who speaketh like — well, God. The great achievement of the King James translators is to have arrived at a language that is both ordinary and heightened, that rings in the ear and lingers in the mind. And that all 54 of them were able to agree on every phrase, every comma, without sounding as gassy and evasive as the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission, is little short of amazing, in itself proof of something like divine inspiration.

via Why the King James Bible Endures – NYTimes.com.

Easter Sunday at St Giles

Join us this Easter Sunday

To celebrate the rising of Christ we will be holding our All Age Communion service at 10am this coming Sunday at St Giles.

Suitable for the youngest through to the most senior among us we will celebrating the triumph of Christ over death using song, drama, and film.

Immediately following the service we will hold our Annual Balloon Release and Easter Egg hunt in the Rectory Garden.

Do join us if you can!

The Silence of Holy Saturday

A thunderstorm is rumbling in the dusk over St Giles. It makes these words of Richard Neuhas even more poignant.

The church is dark now. The altar is stripped and bare. Some are getting up and leaving in silence. Others remain kneeling, looking into the darkness. Holy Saturday is ahead, the most quiet day of the year. The silence of that silent night, holy night, the night when God was born was broken by the sounds of a baby, a mother’s words of comfort and angels in concert. Holy Saturday, by contrast, is the sound of prefect silence. Yesterday’s mockery, the good thief’s prayer, the cry of dereliction—all that is past now. Mary has dried her tears, and the whole creation is still, waiting for what will happen next.

Some say that on Holy Saturday Jesus went to hell in triumph, to free the souls long imprisoned there. Others say he descended into a death deeper than death, to embrace in his love even the damned. We do not know. Scripture, tradition and pious writings provide hints and speculations, but about this most silent day it is perhaps best to observe the silence. One day I expect he will tell us all about it. When we are able to understand what we cannot now even understand why we cannot understand.

Courtesy of Kendall Harmon

Praying for Kuwait

During the 40 days of Lent I’m committed to praying each day for Christians in the 40 countries where the cost of being a follower of Christ is highest. I invite you to do the same. The information on the prayer needs of each country comes from a combination of Open Doors, Barnabas Fund and Operation World.

Praying for Kuwait

An oil-rich wedge of desert between Iraq and Saudi Arabia at the northwest end of the Arabian Gulf.

Answer to Prayer

The underground Kuwaiti Church is gaining strength, numbers and maturity, and more converted Kuwaitis are making themselves known publicly. These latter believers are gathering for worship, teaching and prayer with boldness and open witness. While those who openly identify themselves as Christian are still a small minority, both this group and the much larger underground are growing rapidly.

Challenge for Prayer

Kuwait’s material wealth has answered few problems. The government is divided between modernists and traditionalists. Islamist activity is increasing. Young people are frustrated and very bored. Materialism still holds powerful sway, since many have no greater vision about how to use their wealth for good. Pray that Kuwaiti leaders and people might embrace the Saviour.

Please Pray

  • For the growth of the Kuwaiti church
  • For the ‘Bidoon’ (literally without) – stateless Arabs adrift in the Middle East, they are present in Kuwait in significant numbers, they have no known believers and almost no ministry to them.
  • Kuwaiti Arabs overseas particularly those who are students in the West that they would be exposed to the Gospel.

Praying for Qatar

During the 40 days of Lent I’m committed to praying each day for Christians in the 40 countries where the cost of being a follower of Christ is highest. I invite you to do the same. The information on the prayer needs of each country comes from a combination of Open Doors, Barnabas Fund and Operation World.

Praying for Qatar

Nearly all citizens in Qatar are Muslims; almost the entire Christian population are expatriates. The constitution explicitly provides for freedom of worship, and Roman Catholic and Anglican Churches are officially recognised. However, the Government places restrictions on public worship and continues to prohibit evangelisation of non-Muslims. Several expatriate Christians were expelled from the country in 2010, almost certainly because of their Christian faith. Leaving Islam is considered apostasy; believers from a Muslim background face severe persecution.

Answer to Prayer

Qatar’s Christian communities have been offered land on which to build the first churches in Qatar since Islam’s arrival. A Catholic facility will be followed by Anglican and Protestant buildings. Pray that this will enable greater unity, effective discipling of believers and sensitive sharing of faith.

Challenge for Prayer

Qatari believers number but a few. From Arab, Persian and Bantu (former slaves) extraction, Qataris are almost without exception Muslim. Pray that a Qatari church would be birthed and that Qataris at home and abroad would hear about Jesus.

Please Pray

  • That isolated indigenous believers will connect with other believers and experience real fellowship
  • That the Qatari people will open up to the gospel and not rely on wealth and their feeling of Islamic superiority
  • For the witness of the expatriate Christian community.
  • Pray that no more foreign Christians will be expelled from the country.